Curricula for the Dutch Sign Language Teacher/Interpreter degree-programme

Project situation with speech-to-text interpreter

How effective and efficient are the bachelor curricula for the Dutch Sign Language Teacher and Interpreter degree-programme? Is there a clear route to the exit qualifications, are the learning objectives compatible with course content and are the teaching methods used innovative and evidence-based?

Objective

The objective of this project was to establish how effective and efficient the current curricula are for the Dutch Sign Language Teacher/Interpreter and Associate Degree Speech to Text Interpreter bachelor’s degree programmes.

Results

Houkes, L., Vinke, K., Hammer, A., & Nijen Twilhaar, J. (November 2017). Research report (phase 1) on the Dutch Sign Language Teacher/Interpreter degree programmes. HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, Research group Deaf Studies, internal publication (Dutch).

Phase 2 has been delivered in the form of various publications:

  • Van Loon, E. & Boers-Visker, E. (April 2019). Report on learning objectives for the Dutch Sign Language learning continuity pathway. HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, Research group Deaf Studies, internal publication (Dutch).
  • Houkes, L. & Hammer, A. (June 2019). Learning from the past: A retrospective case study of a curriculum for sign language interpreting in The Netherlands. Presentation at Critical Link International 9, 14 – 16 June Tokyo Japan.
  • Hammer, A., Wulffraat, L. & Houkes, L. (June 2019). A situated learning approach towards the development of interpersonal competence in sign language interpreter students. Poster presentation at Critical Link International 9, 14 – 16 June Tokyo Japan.

Duration

01 January 2017 - 01 August 2019

Approach

In this project, we studied the Dutch Sign Language and Interpreter Skills learning continuity pathways in a literature review.

A course is effective if:

  • it systematically works towards the achievement of the exit qualifications in question;
  • the learning objectives for the course have been formulated on the basis of the learning continuity pathway;
  • the learning objectives increase in difficulty.

A course is efficient if:

  • its content is reflected in the learning objectives;
  • sufficient use is made of educational innovations like 'blended learning' and Provisto feedback software (in which students give lecturers feedback by video);
  • sufficient use is made of evidence-based teaching methods like peer reviews and formative assessments.

HU researchers involved in the research

Related research groups

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Annemiek Hammer | Researcher | Deaf Studies

Annemiek Hammer

  • Researcher
  • Research group: Deaf Studies