Gender differences in victimization and the relation to personality disorders in forensic psychiatry

Authors Anouk Bohle , Vivienne de Vogel
Published in Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma
Publication date 2017
Research groups Working with Mandated Clients
Type Article

Summary

Gender differences in victimization were retrospectively examined in 218 male and 218 female patients who have been admitted to one of four Dutch forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1984 and 2014. Case files were studied and variables relating to victimization and psychopathology were coded. It was found that the prevalence rates of victimization were higher among female patients than among male patients, both during childhood and adulthood. Childhood sexual abuse was found to be more prevalent among women than men, however, no differences were found for emotional and physical abuse or neglect during childhood. Women with a history of emotional or sexual abuse were significantly more often diagnosed with borderline personality disorder than women without childhood victimization. Men with a history of physical abuse were significantly more often diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder than men without childhood victimization. Clinical and policy implications of this study for forensic practice are discussed.

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Language English
Published in Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma
Year and volume 26 4
Page range 411-429

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