Acne healthcare in the Netherlands

Authors Femke de Vries
Publication date 2022
Research groups Innovation in Healthcare Processes in Pharmacology
Type Doctoral Thesis

Summary

Acne vulgaris is considered one of the most common medical skin conditions globally, affecting approximately 85% of individuals worldwide. While acne is most prevalent among adolescents between 15 to 24 years old, it is not uncommon in adults either. Acne addresses a number of different challenges, causing a multidimensional disease burden. These challenges include clinical sequelae, such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) and the chance of developing lifelong disfiguring scars, psychological aspects such as deficits in health related quality of life, chronicity of acne, economic factors, and treatment-related issues, such as antimicrobial resistance. The multidimensionality of the disease burden stipulates the importance of an effective and timely treatment in a well organised care system. Within the Netherlands, acne care provision is managed by several types of professional care givers, each approaching acne care from different angles: (I) general practitioners (GPs) who serve as ‘gatekeepers’ of healthcare within primary care; (II) dermatologists providing specialist medical care within secondary care; (III) dermal therapists, a non-physician medical professional with a bachelor’s degree, exclusively operating within the Australian and Dutch primary and secondary health care; and (IV) beauticians, mainly working within the cosmetology or wellness domain. However, despite the large variety in acne care services, many patients experience a delay between the onset of acne and receiving an effective treatment, or a prolonged use of care, which raises the question whether acne related care resources are being used in the most effective and (cost)efficient way. It is therefore necessary to gain insights into the organization and quality of Dutch acne health care beyond conventional guidelines and protocols. Exploring areas of care that may need improvement allow Dutch acne healthcare services to develop and improve the quality of acne care services in harmony with patient needs.

On this publication contributed

  • Femke de Vries| Researcher | Research group Innovation in Healthcare Processes in Pharmacology
    Femke de Vries
    • Researcher
    • Research groups: Innovation in Healthcare Processes in Pharmacology

Language English
Key words acne, health care, skin therapy, skin care, health care organisation

Femke de Vries

Femke de Vries| Researcher | Research group Innovation in Healthcare Processes in Pharmacology

Femke de Vries

  • Researcher
  • Research group: Innovation in Healthcare Processes in Pharmacology